The Internet Law Blog

5.19.2003




Googlewashing debate continues. The issue is this: Do blogs rate too highly in a Google search? If you search for a story about the man who is selling tea kettles on ebay with reflective photos of his nude body (using the words "tea" "kettle" "nude" and "ebay") the Internet Law Blog is listed number 2 on the search results. True journalists argue that blogs should not receive that kind of presence on Google, and that more traditional media should be rated higher. The important point articulated Doc Searls' important is that "If you want to be in Google, you gotta be on the Web." If traditional media wants Google-views, they should open up their archives to the masses. If they don't, it's hard to be sympathetic to their view that blogs receive too much attention.


But now Google faces a new threat. Microsoft is taking aim at the popular site.


And some amazing facts from Google . . .

It would take 5,707 years to do a manual search of Google's 3 billion Web pages, at one minute a page

It takes 0.5 seconds for Google to search its database

You can have the Google home page set up in 88 languages, including Urdu, Latin and Klingon



5.18.2003




The Feds arrested 50 people this weekend. charging them with a variety of crimes, from setting up fake banking websites to collect the account numbers of unsuspecting customers to surreptitiously taping and selling unreleased movies. According to Ashcroft, online crime now accounts for more than one-half of all fraud complaints. Since Jan. 1, the Justice Department and other federal agencies have uncovered more than 89,000 victims bilked out of some $176 million. Hopefully the government has carefully thought through how they will establish jurisdiction over the defendants. More importantly, I hope they have the evidence necessary to prove their allegations so that the online thieves spend some real time in jail. Otherwise, the message will be completely lost.


Home |  About Me |  Contact me
Creative Commons License Listed on BlogShares
< ? law blogs # >